Accessible Content for Everyone


Image of man using an ereader to access content.

Many of us can’t read printed books, newspapers, and magazines. For example, people with dyslexia, visual disabilities, motor or cognitive impairments, as well as age-related macular degeneration can find traditional print impossible to access fully. Digital publications offer huge opportunities for improved access to content.

Publishers are working hard to ensure their digital content is as accessible as possible. This can be challenging depending on the type of content they are working with but there is much work being done to increase the accessibility of rich content in ebooks and the EPUB 3 format offers the most opportunity for mainstream accessibility.

Inclusive publishers want their content to be available at the same time, at the same price and in the same format for everyone.

Useful Reading

Cressida Cowell, Children’s Laureate, Creates Charter for Reading

Cressida Cowell, author of the How to Train your Dragon series,  has been elected as Children’s Laureate in the U.K. Speaking to an audience […]

The History and Future of Audiobooks

This article was kindly submitted by Wendy Reid, Senior QA at Rakuten Kobo Inc and one of the co-chairs of the Publishing Working Group […]

Global Specifications for Accessible Publications

Accessible books were originally produced by organizations working for people with disabilities who are, of course, the accessibility experts. Publishers are now expected to […]

Accessible Ebook Publishing in Canada: The Business Case

This article was kindly submitted by Laura Brady and Daniella Levy-Pinto who are presenting this Business Case for Accessibility at The Toronto Book Summit […]

Accessibility in Publishing: A Case Study from Kogan Page

Accessibility: The quality or characteristic of something that makes it possible to approach, enter or use it Context Broadly speaking, there are three key […]